Getting Promotions In Today's Economy

in Promotion

With today's economy and continued job scarcity, getting a promotion is still very possible. However, it is not easy.

Due to the continued high unemployment rate, to achieve the career goals that you desire, certain changes must occur in both your life and daily work routine. It is imperative that these start today. Putting these changes off will only hinder your goals.

To guide you along the right career path, below, you will find four very easy, quick changes you can make at work that will greatly increase your odds of getting the promotion and obtaining the salary that you desire.

Start Associating Yourself With The More Successful Employees

To even be considered for a promotion, you must cease to be associated with the individuals who are troublesome in any manner. This pertains to the individuals who don't get along with the boss, don't like the company and / or who don't excel at their job.

If your friends at the office are not the rising stars, you're probably hanging out with the wrong crowd and you need to switch.

For any manager, to give a promotion to an employee can be quite stressful.

In the same exact fashion that you not wanting to be passed up for the advancement, your boss doesn't want to make the wrong decision regarding whom to promote.

Because this fear of failure, typically your manager will make a conservative decision as to whom they give the opportunity to.

For your supervisor, conservative decisions are easy - it's basic risk management.

Once you clearly visualize this decision making process through the eyes of your manager, your attitude and behavior instantaneously change.

To be given a promotion, your boss must trust you and must feel that you are highly responsible. One of the best ways to begin to increase your perceived reliability around the office is to stop associating with the average employees in the company.

Start Showing Up Earlier and Staying Later

The most successful people in life are the ones that show ambition and they are the ones that work tenaciously hard for their companies.

Following this simplistic model for success, it is imperative that you get into the habit of working additional hours. Starting today, it is crucial that you stop putting in the norm and begin staying overtime at the office. This is regardless as to whether you get paid to do so.

You'd be very surprised as staying those few extra hours is sure to catch your boss's attention. They will start to perceive you as someone who is reliable and who gives extra effort when necessary.

Remember. The less risky you make it for your boss to promote you, the more likely you are to be promoted.

Start Dressing Nicer To The Office

Many don't know this, but the way you dress is can almost instantaneously alter your boss's perception of you. Statistics tells us that the way we look to others is an important factor in both life and business.

If you begin dressing nicer and making sure that you come to work looking your best, the likelihood of grabbing your boss's attention will rise astronomically.

Promotions are always hard to come by. However, staying away from the bad crowd, putting in the few extra hours at the office and looking your best will increase your odds of getting any desired promotion significantly.

 

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Ken Sundheim has 88 articles online and 2 fans

Ken Sundheim was the Founder is the acting President of KAS Placement. KAS does executive search for companies ranging from BNY Mellon to smaller, start-up organizations. The agency was founded by Ken from a studio apartment on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. KAS also has 2 new businesses ready to launch this year. Ken and his wife, Alison, live on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.

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Getting Promotions In Today's Economy

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Getting Promotions In Today's Economy

This article was published on 2011/02/18